Schedule for Lemon Creek Court Dates…Please show your support by attending on the dates posted.

Please mark your calendar for April 11th, Nelson Court House 9:00 as Lemon Creek is setting Court dates and there has been interest to have it moved to Vancouver and the more of the public in attendance the more the judge will realize the community interest in Justice for Lemon Creek. Usually the court begins at 9:30 but I did miss it once as they put it up to 9:00 so I am saying 9:00.
On another community rights issue Marilyn James, Sinixt Nation also has a date that day so you are invited to support both of these important cases and support the work of women who have worked for years to protect where we live. Hope to see you there. Again the 11th of April next Tuesday. Pls forward to your lists.

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An Urgent Message from the “Ancient Ones ” to the Native American People about Planet Earth

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Why We Should Celebrate Wetlands on World Water Day – Think globally Act locally.

Perry Ridge Water Users Association supports protection of wetlands. Although there is recognition of the importance of wetlands and support for reclaiming them there is very little protection. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Protect the head water wetlands on Perry Ridge.

International World Water Day is held annually on 22 March as a means of focusing attention on the importance of freshwater and advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources.
Water is the essential building block of life. But it is more than just essential to quench thirst or protect health; water is vital for creating jobs and supporting economic, social, and human development.
Today, there are over 663 million people living without a safe water supply close to home, spending countless hours queuing or trekking to distant sources, and coping with the health impacts of using contaminated water.
Water is a fundamental human right. Canada joined the international consensus and recognized the right to water at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable development in 2012. We must live up to that commitment where we live.
Conservancy of Canada stated in 2015:
“Some say water is the lifeblood of this planet, and it’s true! The areas where land and water meet (wetlands, coasts, shorelines and stream banks, to name a few) are places that brim with biodiversity and rare species. The healthy state of these ecosystems is crucial for nature’s provision of services such as purification of air and proper nutrient cycling.
Healthy wetlands and watersheds play key roles in the quality of our water resources. They act like giant sponges that help absorb and replenish water to buffer flood and drought risks. They are also vital nesting, breeding and staging grounds for waterfowl and many other species and continue to be among the most diverse ecosystems of all!
But in spite of their important roles, our world’s wetlands are facing serious woes.
Troubling statistics estimates that 64 percent of world’s wetlands have disappeared since the 1900s (Ramsar Fact Sheet, 2015). Canada, home to a quarter of the world’s wetlands, is not immune to these trends. “
We are coming to better understand and appreciate that nature is a key part of the infrastructure for our cities and communities. Just as we need pipes and pumps as a part of our water system, we also need healthy wetlands, rivers and watersheds to ensure a future of clean and abundant fresh water.
 Perry Ridge Water Users Association continues to lobby the government to protect the watersheds locally and recognizes how fortunate we are to still have high elevation wetlands that provide us with good water. www.perryridge.org

 


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Press Release – The Geological History of The Slocan and Kootenay Rivers

Press Release, February 13, 2017, Slocan Valley, BC

Perry Ridge Water Users Uploads U-Tube Video  The Geological History of the Slocan and Kootenay River Basins presentation by Lesley Anderton

 Perry Ridge Water Users Association announces a new uploaded educational video, which the public can link to through our website (perryridge.org) at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOI8oIkn_kI&t=52s

Marilyn Burgoon, President of the Association states: “The public now has the opportunity to learn from the uploaded u-tube presentation The Geological History of the Slocan and Kootenay River Basin about the special place we call home in the West Kootenays.

The presentation teaches the geological history going back millions of years, which includes the formation of continents and in particular it teaches about the various rock formations and mountains in the area. It explains what these rocks tell us about the history of the mountains, water and land formations. This presentation deepens our connection to this place and our knowledge of the landscapes that surrounds us, supports our survival, and provides a significant portion of hydroelectric power to the rest of the Province. The presentation shows many beautiful and informative slides about the area.

The appeal of Lesley Anderton, MA (UBC) has been demonstrated over the decades as a much loved Geology instructor at Selkirk College and her knowledge is extensive, and irreplaceable. Ms. Anderton states, “I enjoy sharing my love of the natural environment by interpreting the local geology for non-specialists.”

Lesley Anderton grew up in Lancashire in the north of England where she came to love the outdoors. Having gained a BA (Hons) degree in Geology and Geography from Keele, she won a Commonwealth Scholarship to study at UBC. After completing her master’s degree with a thesis entitled ‘The Quaternary Stratigraphy and Geomorphology of the Lower Thompson Valley’ she returned to work in England at Malham Tarn Field Centre in the Yorkshire Dales. In 1969 Lesley began her 35 year career at Selkirk College, where she taught first and second year geology and geography courses and developed the ‘Geology, Landforms and Soils’ course for renewable resources technology students. In addition she developed a first year Environmental Science Course for non-science majors. In the summers she frequently worked on terrain analysis mapping with Dr June Ryder. Some of the public may recall Dr. June Ryder  from her work locally, “Geological Hazards of the Perry Ridge Benchlands”and her grave concerns about several aspects of the potential effects of logging the Perry Ridge uplands www.perryridge.org

Marilyn James/smum iem matriarch/Sinixt nations) states: “Sinixt nation territory is governed by two traditional/cultural laws. The whuplak’n, the “law of the land”,a premise that literally means that the land and all aspects of the land dictates the protocols of care and use of it. The second law is smum iem and means, “belongs to the women”. The elders (now ancestor Eva Orr, Alvina Lum and Annie Kruger are the Sinixt women who I largely credit for the land, water and cultural knowledge I carry. ”

Videographer Kai Cabodyna’s work has produced an exceptionally clear presentation and audio capturing Lesley’s enthusiasm for geology. The accompanying images demonstrate Lesley Anderton’s extensive knowledge of the landscape. Kai states, “Lesley’s presentation is jam packed with quality information about our place in the Kootenays. Being translated into a video makes this knowledge accessible for a wider audience, allowing people to revisit it and learn something new with every viewing.”

Perry Ridge Water Users Association is a public awareness and advocacy group, focusing on education related to water and land issues in the Slocan Valley. We have been in existence since 1983. The presentation and the video were made possible through the generous funding of Regional District of Central Kootenays, Area E and Area H Discretionary Fund.

Contact:  Marilyn Burgoon @ 604-259-0996 or e-mail lemon_creek_private_prosecution@ yahoo.ca

P1030323

 

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2017 letter to Ministry of Forests

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Without proper updated precipitation data and the calculation of the carbon sequestration of the forests, the true natural capital of the forests is not addressed or calculated into a true cost benefit analysis. The work on Perry Ridge needs to be updated and the added data included. Without this data our Association submits that to proceed with any further logging on Perry Ridge is negligent.
Letter to Ministry of Forests -  Arrow Forest Jan 2017

Allen Isaacson Professional Hydrologists Report- ECA Pages 1 to 6… page 1 ECA  pg 2 ECA Page 3 ECA Page 4 ECA  Page 5 ECA  Page 6 ECA

American Geophysical Report
Deforestation in snowy regions causes more floods Green(1)

Judge Parrot – Report  Parrett Decision

The Geological History of The Slocan and Kootenay Rivers

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Season’s Greetings – Perry Ridge Water Users Association

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Season’s Greetings Please support the protection of water and all that depends on it – including all of us. I hope you all have a safe holiday and a healthy and prosperous New Year. Thank you for your support and please make a New Year’s resolution to write to the government. There are e-mail addresses within the letter below for you to use. Water is the source of all life and irreplaceable.

Best Wishes

Marilyn

                            

 
PERRY RIDGE WATER USERS ASSOCIATION
4403 Slocan River Road
Winlaw, BC
V0G 2J0
December 1, 2016
 
                                                Re:  Slocan Valley – Rails to Trails
 
Dear Mr. Cannings:
 
Thank you for your Parliamentary Bulletin Fall 2016. I read the Bulletin and agree that the Rails to Trails are of economic benefit to the small communities it winds its way through. I live in the Slocan Valley and would like to bring to your attention the fact that the forests and watersheds on the valley walls are part of the natural capital that contributes to this economic benefit. 
 
The Rail to Trails follows the Slocan River close to Highway 6.  The valley walls need protection to keep this portion of the Cross Canada Trail system with the visual, natural scenic forested mountains.  In your newsletter you mentioned “the economic benefits could be significantly boosted if the trails were well-maintained, better connected and promoted widely.” Should logging go ahead on the valley walls then the trail will not fulfill tourist expectations of visiting natural, beautiful BC and will impact the economic benefits the local citizens referred to, which also include the economic benefits to the river use by local whitewater rafters, tubers, swimmers, kayakers and canoeists.
 
Protecting these forests will also protect the unstable deeply incised creeks on the valley walls that descend in and around the homes at the base of the mountains.  Dr. June Ryder in her report “Geological Hazards of the Perry Ridge Benchlands” stated her grave concerns about several aspects of the potential effects of logging the Perry Ridge uplands www.perryridge.org. The water users do not accept the increased risk that logging poses to their homes.The creeks do not need any more sediment and debris entering them from logging slash and disturbed soils. The late Dr. Tony Salway pointed out to the Ministry of Forests that there was no snow accumulation data or updated precipitation data. Our Association submits that without prior updated accurate scientific precipitation data collection, it is negligent to preceed with logging above our homes on Perry Ridge.
 
Another benefit to protecting the valley walls is the ability of these forests to sequester carbon and assist the world in helping with climate change effects – these effects also include intense rainfall locally that can exacerbate landslides. 
 
The Slocan River would benefit from less sedimentation and debris flow increased from logging and diverting water. These creeks help maintain water temperatures, helping keep the river clean and improve habitat for fisheries (bull trout, sculpin and trout) and wildlife.(Blue Heron, Screech Owls, Western Toad, Golden Eagle, Baldheaded Eagle and Osprey to name a few.) These areas are wildlife corridors and would provide buffer zones to Valhalla Provincial Park and Kokanee Provincial Park
 
 The Slocan River has important Sinixt cultural sites that will and already have been affected by river erosion and heavy sedimentation and need protection. (Dr. Nathan Goodale’s Report – Report on Archaeological Investigations (20112013) at the Slocan Narrows Pithouse Village (DkQi 1, 2, and17), Southeastern, British Columbia)
 
The Perry Ridge Water Users Association Constitution includes:
 “To act in a manner consistent with the preservation of the visual resources of the viewshed lying within or on both Crown held portions of Perry Ridge.
 
We look forward to you lobbying to exclude the valley walls from the “working forest” and lobby to protect these forests. Perhaps making the valley walls part of the Regional Park system would be a solution.
 
The intact forests on the valley walls are working to protect our lives, homes, Sinixt Cultural sites, water, wildlife habitat, and are a community economic benefit as it relates to the Rails to Trails and the Slocan River. Please visit our website at: www.perryridge.org for further background information.
 
Yours truly,
 
PERRY RIDGE WATER USERS ASSOCIATION
 
(signed Marilyn Burgoon
 
 
Marilyn Burgoon
 
Cc Ministry of Environment
      Ministry of Forests
      Sinixt Nation
      Walter Popoff, RDCK Director
      Federal Ministry of Environment – Climate Change            
      Lilina Lysenko, Counsel
      Katrine Conroy, MLA
      Minister of Public Safety
    • Norns2010Winter_2011-3355

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    The Geological History of the Slocan & Kootenay River Basins

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    LEMON CREEK FUEL SPILL TRIAL DELAYED

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    In 2013 a tanker truck accident spilled 33,000 litres of jet fuel spilled into the Lemon Creek. The public needs to wait a little longer before the trial continues. — The Nelson Daily file photo
    The trial on charges stemming from an aviation fuel spill in the Slocan Valley in 2013 is promising to be a long and complicated one.
    The trial resumed in Nelson on Tuesday- only to be put off for at least two more months.
    Crown counsel John Cliffe told Judge Phillip Seagram the Crown intends to call about 65 witnesses to establish their case.
    It’s going to take time to get the material associated with all those witnesses out to defence attorneys.
    Seagram agreed to put off the trial until at least December 6, with a short check in November to bring all parties up to date on the preparations.
    The Executive Flight Centre, one of its employees, and the provincial government are all co-defendants in the case, begun after a tanker truck carrying aviation fuel up a logging road in the Slocan Valley tipped over and spilled 33,000 litres of fuel into Lemon Creek in July 2013.
    The spill killed fish and wildlife downstream, and affected shallow wells of residents living in the area.  Residents were also forced to evacuate their homes while the cleanup took place.
    It took nearly three years for charges to be laid, and only came after a local activist, Marilyn Burgoon, successfully laid private criminal charges against the defendants. Her win in court prompted the federal government to lay charges in July.
    Burgoon said she was happy to hear the Crown is preparing to present so many witnesses for the prosecution.
    “I’m glad they’re doing a good job on the investigation and prosecution,” she told reporters after Tuesday’s hearing. “It’s something I never could have done, it would have been too costly and lengthy- and I can’t access what the government can access in terms of information.”
    The defendants have been charged with two counts of “depositing a deleterious substance in a water frequented by fish” under the Fisheries Act. The penalty on conviction is a minimum of $5,000 for an individual and $100,000 for the government or a company.

    There are also six counts of “introducing waste into a stream causing pollution” under the Environmental Management Act. The maximum penalty set out in the Act is a $1-million fine or six months in jail.
    The defendants have not made their pleas in the case.
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    Families reach $10 million settlement with Grandy Lake Forest Associates over deadly 2014 Landslide

    Families reach $10 million settlement with Grandy Lake Forest Associates over deadly 2014 landslide Families reach $10 million settlement with Grandy Lake Forest Associates over deadly 2014 landslide

    The Perry Ridge Water Users Association continues to work to avoid such a tragedy on the unstable slopes in the Slocan Valley. 
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    BC Rivers Day 2016

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    The Geological History of the Slocan and Kootenay Basin presented by Lesley Anderton at the Harrop Community Hall on BC Rivers Day September 25th.

    If you missed the Nakusp or Slocan Presentation“The Geological History of the Slocan and Kootenay Basins” presented by Lesley Anderton or you would like to see it again, you have another opportunity on BC Rivers Day at the Harrop Community Hall. . There will be an opening by Sinixt Matriarch, at 12:00, a luncheon (by donation) and an educational visual slide presentation, concluding with a field trip to Kootenay Lake. Everyone welcome and tourists, in particular can learn the amazing geological history of this area of British Columbia. Rock climbers will also be interested in the information about the rocks in this area.

    The presentation teaches the geological history going back millions of years, which includes the formation of continents and in particular it teaches about the various rock formations and mountains in the area. It explains what these rocks tell us about the history of the mountains, water and land formations. This presentation deepens our connection to this place and our knowledge of the landscapes that surrounds us, supports our survival, and provides a significant portion of hydroelectric power to the rest of the Province. .

    Many of you will already know Lesley Anderton, retired Instructor from Selkirk College. Ms. Anderton grew up in Lancashire in the north of England where she came to love the outdoors. Having gained a BA (Hons) degree in Geology and Geography from Keele, she won a Commonwealth Scholarship to study at UBC. After completing her master’s degree with a thesis entitled ‘The Quaternary Stratigraphy and Geomorphology of the Lower Thompson Valley’ she returned to work in England at Malham Tarn Field Centre in the Yorkshire Dales. In 1969 Lesley began her 35 year career at Selkirk College, where she taught first and second year geology and geography courses and developed the ‘Geology, Landforms and Soils’ course for renewable resources technology students. In addition she developed a first year Environmental Science Course for non-science majors. In the summers she frequently worked on terrain analysis mapping with Dr June Ryder. Some of you may recall Dr. June Ryder from her work locally, “Geological Hazards of the Perry Ridge Benchlands”and her grave concerns about several aspects of the potential effects of logging the Perry Ridge uplands www.perryridge.org

    Ms. Anderton has always been interested in sharing her love of the natural environment with non geologists and enjoys giving talks on local geology and leading field trips. In her spare time she enjoys hiking and cross country skiing as well as visiting polar latitudes. The appeal of Lesley Anderton has been demonstrated over the decades as a much loved Geology instructor at Selkirk College and her knowledge is extensive, and irreplaceable. We invite attendees to bring their film equipment so that this presentation may be filmed for future reference (see advertisement in this issue of Pennywise and in the Nelson Star next week. Thank you to the RDCK Area E Discretionary Fund.

    We look forward to seeing you and celebrating BC and World Rivers Day.

    Submitted by Perry Ridge Water Users Association

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